Discussion:
plastic replaced by iron cans
(too old to reply)
o***@gmail.com
2019-06-18 18:51:03 UTC
Permalink
The disposal of plastic bottles is not a good plan.
It would be better if iron cans were used. Then the
iron would rust soon. Iron alloy foils can replace
plastic bags.

It is not too late.
dlzc
2019-06-18 19:58:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
The disposal of plastic bottles is not a good plan.
It would be better if iron cans were used. Then the
iron would rust soon. Iron alloy foils can replace
plastic bags.
It is not too late.
Iron is a poor choice, since it can reach toxic levels in the human bloodstream.

Aluminum is a better choice, overall. Not that any metal is without some side effects. Glass is (usually) better still.

Plastic is fine, as long as we actually recycle it, not just pay someone else to handle it (and they end up burning it).

David A. Smith
o***@gmail.com
2019-06-19 19:13:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by dlzc
Post by o***@gmail.com
The disposal of plastic bottles is not a good plan.
It would be better if iron cans were used. Then the
iron would rust soon. Iron alloy foils can replace
plastic bags.
It is not too late.
Iron is a poor choice, since it can reach toxic levels in the human bloodstream.
Aluminum is a better choice, overall. Not that any metal is without some side effects. Glass is (usually) better still.
Plastic is fine, as long as we actually recycle it, not just pay someone else to handle it (and they end up burning it).
David A. Smith
Plastic is traditionally not fine. Iron can be used for non-food
containers. Irons will rust, unlike glass and aluminum. In one
century, cans turn to mud. The shelf life of iron cans will be
two weeks for some contents. Our loss is Earth's gain.
Frank
2019-06-19 19:49:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Post by dlzc
Post by o***@gmail.com
The disposal of plastic bottles is not a good plan.
It would be better if iron cans were used. Then the
iron would rust soon. Iron alloy foils can replace
plastic bags.
It is not too late.
Iron is a poor choice, since it can reach toxic levels in the human bloodstream.
Aluminum is a better choice, overall. Not that any metal is without some side effects. Glass is (usually) better still.
Plastic is fine, as long as we actually recycle it, not just pay someone else to handle it (and they end up burning it).
David A. Smith
Plastic is traditionally not fine. Iron can be used for non-food
containers. Irons will rust, unlike glass and aluminum. In one
century, cans turn to mud. The shelf life of iron cans will be
two weeks for some contents. Our loss is Earth's gain.
Cans must be lined. They are better for food than plastics as plastics
are permeable to gasses. Depending on the plastic permeability can vary
over 1,000%. A child's inflated rubber balloon will be flat in a day
but a metalized Mylar balloon will be inflated for a long time.
o***@gmail.com
2019-07-29 03:27:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank
Post by o***@gmail.com
Post by dlzc
Post by o***@gmail.com
The disposal of plastic bottles is not a good plan.
It would be better if iron cans were used. Then the
iron would rust soon. Iron alloy foils can replace
plastic bags.
It is not too late.
Iron is a poor choice, since it can reach toxic levels in the human bloodstream.
Aluminum is a better choice, overall. Not that any metal is without some side effects. Glass is (usually) better still.
Plastic is fine, as long as we actually recycle it, not just pay someone else to handle it (and they end up burning it).
David A. Smith
Plastic is traditionally not fine. Iron can be used for non-food
containers. Irons will rust, unlike glass and aluminum. In one
century, cans turn to mud. The shelf life of iron cans will be
two weeks for some contents. Our loss is Earth's gain.
Cans must be lined. They are better for food than plastics as plastics
are permeable to gasses. Depending on the plastic permeability can vary
over 1,000%. A child's inflated rubber balloon will be flat in a day
but a metalized Mylar balloon will be inflated for a long time.
You say cans must be lined. Humans do not need plastic in
their diet. No cans do not need to have plastic. You need
to adjust to world with less plastic, humans adapt, survive.
Our garbage is too much. Expect less convenience, less shelf life,
and less pollution by the chemistry industry.
dlzc
2019-07-29 14:48:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, July 28, 2019 at 8:27:03 PM UTC-7, ***@gmail.com wrote:
...
Post by o***@gmail.com
You say cans must be lined. Humans do not need
plastic in their diet. No cans do not need to have
plastic. You need to adjust to world with less
plastic, humans adapt, survive. Our garbage is too
much. Expect less convenience, less shelf life,
and less pollution by the chemistry industry.
https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=541&tid=98
... there is no safe metal can. Humans can live for a long time in pain with some metal poisoning. Will you be first to condemn billions in this way?

David A. Smith
Martin Brown
2019-08-05 10:31:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by dlzc
...
Post by o***@gmail.com
You say cans must be lined. Humans do not need
plastic in their diet. No cans do not need to have
plastic. You need to adjust to world with less
plastic, humans adapt, survive. Our garbage is too
much. Expect less convenience, less shelf life,
and less pollution by the chemistry industry.
The whole thing is much more finely balanced than you seem to think. The
energy cost to make a steel tin (or aluminium) can is significantly more
than for a plastic bottle - and some plastic bottles are now routinely
recycled - at least in the UK. I realise in the US you have much more of
a throw away society with even glass bottles hardy recycled at all.

https://cen.acs.org/materials/inorganic-chemistry/glass-recycling-US-broken/97/i6
Post by dlzc
https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=541&tid=98
... there is no safe metal can. Humans can live for a long time in pain with some metal poisoning. Will you be first to condemn billions in this way?
Tin cans are not really all that dangerous. Organo-tin compounds are
another kettle of (shell)fish altogether but TBT has been banned now.

Lacquering tins internally is better but is not essential.
Stuff keeps in a well sealed tin for a very long time.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Loading...