Discussion:
mystery fragrance
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RichD
2020-10-06 17:37:04 UTC
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Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.

Explain -
--
Rich
Dean
2020-10-06 18:37:53 UTC
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Post by RichD
Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.
Explain -
--
Rich
Someone poured their warm root beer down the drain.
RichD
2020-10-07 22:27:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean
Post by RichD
Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.
Someone poured their warm root beer down the drain.
Is there such a thing as antiseptic gas?


--
Rich
Martin Brown
2020-10-08 07:37:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichD
Post by Dean
Post by RichD
Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.
Someone poured their warm root beer down the drain.
Is there such a thing as antiseptic gas?
Lister's phenol comes pretty close. You can smell it very easily.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
dlzc
2020-10-08 14:23:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichD
Post by Dean
Post by RichD
Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.
Someone poured their warm root beer down the drain.
Is there such a thing as antiseptic gas?
I was in a Fry's grocery store the other day, and smelled something like a cross between cinnamon and root beer by the registers. There are a number of hand soaps (so maybe sanitzers) that have a spicy smell like this. We brought a bunch of scented hand sanitzers to the nurses (two years ago), most of those were floral however.

There is a used bookstore near me that runs their ozone generator on their air handler year around now, not just during winter, with COVID-19. Might be a whopping 0.05 to 0.07 ppm in places.

David A. Smith
Dean
2020-10-08 17:43:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichD
Post by Dean
Post by RichD
Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.
Someone poured their warm root beer down the drain.
Is there such a thing as antiseptic gas?
I was in a Fry's grocery store the other day, and smelled something like a cross between cinnamon and root beer by the registers. There are a number of hand soaps (so maybe sanitzers) that have a spicy smell like this. We brought a bunch of scented hand sanitzers to the nurses (two years ago), most of those were floral however.
There is a used bookstore near me that runs their ozone generator on their air handler year around now, not just during winter, with COVID-19. Might be a whopping 0.05 to 0.07 ppm in places.
David A. Smith
That's fairly high ozone levels. You would think folks would find that annoying. Ozone is not a pleasant odor.
dlzc
2020-10-08 18:26:26 UTC
Permalink
Dear Dean:

On Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 10:43:07 AM UTC-7, Dean wrote:
...
Post by Dean
That's fairly high ozone levels.
For a home. But workplaces occasionally get as high as 0.1 ppm.
Post by Dean
You would think folks would find that annoying.
Ozone is not a pleasant odor.
Ozone-in-air is nasty (makes a little NOx too). Ozone-in-oxygen is a little "sweeter". And either can trigger an asthma attack, headaches, and anemia.

I took a shot of 12wt% ozone into my nose once, the shock made me whiff it in. Was wiped out for hours. Low gas flow, never sure if it is making ozone or not...

David A. Smith
Dean
2020-10-09 11:46:40 UTC
Permalink
...
Post by Dean
That's fairly high ozone levels.
For a home. But workplaces occasionally get as high as 0.1 ppm.
Post by Dean
You would think folks would find that annoying.
Ozone is not a pleasant odor.
Ozone-in-air is nasty (makes a little NOx too). Ozone-in-oxygen is a little "sweeter". And either can trigger an asthma attack, headaches, and anemia.
I took a shot of 12wt% ozone into my nose once, the shock made me whiff it in. Was wiped out for hours. Low gas flow, never sure if it is making ozone or not...
David A. Smith
Hi David,

I am well acquainted with ozone in my workplace. We use UV lamps to cure coatings and inks. The lamps are very good at generating ozone as a byproduct. Every now and then, the exhaust ducting would fail and operators would begin to complain about headaches, eye irritation and itchiness. One trip to the affected area tells me immediately what the problem is. We've measured levels from 0.08 (max recommended over 8 hours) to 1.5 ppm (nasty). Shutting down the lamps and getting maintenance to fix the exhaust is an easy solution.

Dean
dlzc
2020-10-09 14:47:27 UTC
Permalink
Dear Dean:

On Friday, October 9, 2020 at 4:46:43 AM UTC-7, Dean wrote:
...
Post by Dean
I am well acquainted with ozone in my workplace.
We use UV lamps to cure coatings and inks. The
lamps are very good at generating ozone as a
byproduct. Every now and then, the exhaust
ducting would fail and operators would begin to
complain about headaches, eye irritation and
itchiness.
The last two symptoms are probably NOx, more than ozone...
Post by Dean
One trip to the affected area tells me immediately
what the problem is. We've measured levels from
0.08 (max recommended over 8 hours) to 1.5 ppm (nasty).
... yes, it is amazing that your nose can "get used to" fairly high levels, and not send out a warning.
Post by Dean
Shutting down the lamps and getting maintenance
to fix the exhaust is an easy solution.
Yes, I make ozone into water equipment, I just did not want to act like it was safe to breathe.

Not trying to claim you did not know what you were talking about. Just nice to discuss actual "chemistry" here for a change.

David A. Smith
Dean
2020-10-12 15:25:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by dlzc
...
Post by Dean
I am well acquainted with ozone in my workplace.
We use UV lamps to cure coatings and inks. The
lamps are very good at generating ozone as a
byproduct. Every now and then, the exhaust
ducting would fail and operators would begin to
complain about headaches, eye irritation and
itchiness.
The last two symptoms are probably NOx, more than ozone...
Post by Dean
One trip to the affected area tells me immediately
what the problem is. We've measured levels from
0.08 (max recommended over 8 hours) to 1.5 ppm (nasty).
... yes, it is amazing that your nose can "get used to" fairly high levels, and not send out a warning.
Post by Dean
Shutting down the lamps and getting maintenance
to fix the exhaust is an easy solution.
Yes, I make ozone into water equipment, I just did not want to act like it was safe to breathe.
Not trying to claim you did not know what you were talking about. Just nice to discuss actual "chemistry" here for a change.
David A. Smith
Hi David, yes it is nice to have actual chemistry in here! We had air sampling done and results showed no NOx. We did see a few ppm of N-vinyl pyrrolidinone which is a component in one of the coatings we use. That prompted us to add extra ventilation and a bit more enclosure. We've been lobbying to replace the NVP for a few years now but cost (the almighty $) keeps rearing it's head. I suspect it'll be forced on us as NVP will probably be banned here in the near future.

Cheers

Dean

Peter Jason
2020-10-09 01:46:08 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 10:37:04 -0700 (PDT), RichD
Post by RichD
Yesterday I was visiting in a hospital. While there,
I made use of a plumbing facility. The room smelled of root beer.
Explain -
The flavor & fragrance industry is worth billions.
You can buy hamburger fragrance in a spray can (if you flip
hamburgers) and sometimes they use too much.
Restaurants can enhance their foods with canned fragrances/flavors and
the poor customer is none the wiser.
Root beer may be enhanced with vanilla and similar.

Perhaps they flushed a failed batch?
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