Discussion:
What may be IUPAC name of two cyclo-alkane/Benzene rings passing through each other?
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j***@gmail.com
2020-07-17 03:54:04 UTC
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Hello,

I am no chemist. So, apology in advance for anything nonsense posted here.

However, while discussing IUPAC naming with my high school junior son, I came across this idea, which is conceivable, may not always be possible.

Quickest imagination is two Benzene rings passing through each other. Behavior of this molecule may be significantly different from two Benzene rings.
The idea can be extended to any two or more cyclical molecules.
To make the matter worse, we can think of any entanglement of various rings, not necessary a linear chain.
It may end up in meta-catanation of rings.

It isn't exactly an stereoisomer of Benzene/cyclo-alkane because it is an isomer of *two* (or more) molecules instead of one.
(I hope you are with me so far.)

Question 1: How are such chemicals named?
Question 2: What do you call such a condition?
Question 3: Are such chemicals known?

Thanks in advance,
-Bhushit
Ian Gay
2020-07-17 06:26:03 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Hello,
I am no chemist. So, apology in advance for anything nonsense posted here.
However, while discussing IUPAC naming with my high school junior son,
I came across this idea, which is conceivable, may not always be
possible.
Quickest imagination is two Benzene rings passing through each other.
Behavior of this molecule may be significantly different from two
Benzene rings. The idea can be extended to any two or more cyclical
molecules. To make the matter worse, we can think of any entanglement
of various rings, not necessary a linear chain. It may end up in
meta-catanation of rings.
It isn't exactly an stereoisomer of Benzene/cyclo-alkane because it is
an isomer of *two* (or more) molecules instead of one.
(I hope you are with me so far.)
Question 1: How are such chemicals named?
Question 2: What do you call such a condition?
Question 3: Are such chemicals known?
Thanks in advance,
-Bhushit
See wikipedia article on "catenane". It won't happen with any ring as
small as benzene.

Ian
j***@gmail.com
2020-07-17 07:03:32 UTC
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Thanks. That is really educative.

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