Discussion:
What is Ammonia-D?
(too old to reply)
s***@gmail.com
2014-04-08 18:41:09 UTC
Permalink
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
I think that the "D" stood for detergent.
"Diluted."
Speaking of which, what is the approximate NH3 concentration of standard
(no soap, no lemon scent etc.) supermarket ammonia water?
-Mike
Can't you find that out with a simple titration? Just grab the numbers off of Wikipedia and do a quick titration. If that information is relevant to you, you should know how to do a titration.
Frank
2014-04-08 19:19:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
I think that the "D" stood for detergent.
"Diluted."
Speaking of which, what is the approximate NH3 concentration of standard
(no soap, no lemon scent etc.) supermarket ammonia water?
-Mike
Can't you find that out with a simple titration? Just grab the numbers off of Wikipedia and do a quick titration. If that information is relevant to you, you should know how to do a titration.
https://www.whatsinsidescjohnson.com/en-ca/products-by-brand/windex-1/windex-with-ammonia-d-glass--surface-cleaner.aspx
Bruce Sinclair
2014-04-08 23:17:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
I think that the "D" stood for detergent.
"Diluted."
Speaking of which, what is the approximate NH3 concentration of standard
(no soap, no lemon scent etc.) supermarket ammonia water?
Can't you find that out with a simple titration? Just grab the numbers off of
Wikipedia and do a quick titration. If that information is relevant to you,
you should know how to do a titration.
I would have thought that rading the bottle label would be easier ? :)

I have noted the available strength has gone down in the last few years ...
probably due to stupid people pouring it in their eyes, and a bad risk
assessment process deciding that 4% was too high for safety ? :) :)
j***@gmail.com
2014-08-13 22:17:27 UTC
Permalink
Windex Glass Cleaner is advertised as a special formula with exclusive
"Ammonia-D". I thought ammonia is NH3, no left-hand or right-hand
version to deserve a Nobel Prize. The only thing I can think of is ND3
(deuterium substitutes hydrogen), but it is unlikely that cheap Windex
contains such an expensive isotope.
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
--
My Uncle, Melvin Stonebraker, was a Director of Laboratories for Drackett labs in Cincinnati, Ohio- Drackett was the inventor of Windex. Ammonia was found to increase the effectiveness of cleaning. The "D" was simply a marketing name, with the "D" representing the company name "Drackett". The innovation of adding of ammonia to the formula gave it measurable superior cleaning properties and so this formulation was patented http://www.google.com/patents/US3463735 while at the recommendation of Laboratory Manager Charlie Butke, the name Ammonia D was trademarked. Interestingly enough, I checked this story with Charlie two weeks ago at a party as he was still alive and quite sharp at the time of this posting.
Poutnik
2014-08-14 06:06:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Windex Glass Cleaner is advertised as a special formula with exclusive
"Ammonia-D". I thought ammonia is NH3, no left-hand or right-hand
version to deserve a Nobel Prize. The only thing I can think of is ND3
(deuterium substitutes hydrogen), but it is unlikely that cheap Windex
contains such an expensive isotope.
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
--
My Uncle, Melvin Stonebraker, was a Director of Laboratories for Drackett labs in Cincinnati, Ohio- Drackett was the inventor of Windex. Ammonia was found to increase the effectiveness of cleaning. The "D" was simply a marketing name, with the "D" representing the company name "Drackett". The innovation of adding of ammonia to the formula gave it measurable superior cleaning properties and so this formulation was patented http://www.google.com/patents/US3463735 while at the recommendation of Laboratory Manager Charlie Butke, the name Ammonia D was trademarked. Interestingly enough, I checked this story with Charlie two weeks ago at a party as he was still alive and quite sharp at the time of this posting.
Good post, but you may had not noticed you replied to 13 years old post,
and the poster will not probably read it. :-)
--
Poutnik

A wise man guards words he says,
as they may say about him more, than he says about the subject.
dlzc
2014-08-14 14:48:53 UTC
Permalink
Dear Poutnik:

On Wednesday, August 13, 2014 11:06:25 PM UTC-7, Poutnik wrote:
...
Post by Poutnik
Good post, but you may had not noticed you
replied to 13 years old post, and the poster will
not probably read it. :-)
True, but posterity is well served here. At least he was not selling something...

David A. Smith
j***@gmail.com
2014-08-18 15:03:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Poutnik
Post by j***@gmail.com
Windex Glass Cleaner is advertised as a special formula with exclusive
"Ammonia-D". I thought ammonia is NH3, no left-hand or right-hand
version to deserve a Nobel Prize. The only thing I can think of is ND3
(deuterium substitutes hydrogen), but it is unlikely that cheap Windex
contains such an expensive isotope.
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
--
My Uncle, Melvin Stonebraker, was a Director of Laboratories for Drackett labs in Cincinnati, Ohio- Drackett was the inventor of Windex. Ammonia was found to increase the effectiveness of cleaning. The "D" was simply a marketing name, with the "D" representing the company name "Drackett". The innovation of adding of ammonia to the formula gave it measurable superior cleaning properties and so this formulation was patented http://www.google.com/patents/US3463735 while at the recommendation of Laboratory Manager Charlie Butke, the name Ammonia D was trademarked. Interestingly enough, I checked this story with Charlie two weeks ago at a party as he was still alive and quite sharp at the time of this posting.
Good post, but you may had not noticed you replied to 13 years old post,
and the poster will not probably read it. :-)
--
Poutnik
A wise man guards words he says,
as they may say about him more, than he says about the subject.
Dear Potnuk, Since after talking to Charlie, on a lark, I Googled the Question: "What is Ammonia D?" and found this conversation stream in the top 10 hits - I felt compelled to set history straight for posterity (as dizc suggests). After all, to be sure, SC Johnson (current owners of Windex) would have no reason, or even likely corporate knowledge, of a story that happened long ago in the back offices of a now defunct company in Cincinnati, Ohio. Ammonia-D was simply small concentrations of ammonia added to the Windex formulation to give the added value stipulated in the patent that I referenced earlier and the D was a trademark that stood for Drackett Co.
h***@gmail.com
2014-09-07 02:31:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Poutnik
Good post, but you may had not noticed you replied to 13 years old post,
and the poster will not probably read it. :-)
Poutnik,

Maybe not, but I read and appreciated it. Also the best answer to my question.

-R
v***@gmail.com
2015-03-29 01:15:12 UTC
Permalink
http://www.whatsinsidescjohnson.com/en-ca/products-by-brand/windex-1/windex-with-ammonia-d-glass--surface-cleaner.aspx
g***@gmail.com
2018-01-27 05:11:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Poutnik
Good post, but you may had not noticed you replied to 13 years old post,
and the poster will not probably read it. :-)
The original poster is alive and well, just read ***@gmail.com's very informative post. Thank you!

Simon Sunatori
Libor 'Poutnik' Stříž
2018-01-28 10:11:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Poutnik
Good post, but you may had not noticed you replied to 13 years old post,
and the poster will not probably read it. :-)
Simon Sunatori
I made no statement about the live status of the OP.

But, generally. if there was a question/topic
one was interested in 13. years ago,

one either found the answer or solution,
either one was not interested in so much.
--
Poutnik ( The Pilgrim, Der Wanderer )

A wise man guards words he says,
as they say about him more,
than he says about the subject.
s***@gaf.com
2019-02-26 18:34:24 UTC
Permalink
The older formulations used ammonia, but latter used two amine surfactants too, In think that the trademarked idea, it might be patented. These all kept basic (alkaline) in an ammonia solution. These compounds are alkaline and one is also hygroscopic. So they must find keeping a long open time, staying wet, and alkaline works. Alkalinity can allow natural oils to be broken down and become soluble. It also helps other soaps to work best, and they leave non residue as they evaporate. They further combine the alkaline cleaning with a solvent, that can help cut and lift grease and even hydrocarbons. Is sort of like a streak free volatile liquid version of what TSP does on walls (TSP leaves a residue, but otherwise great stuff).
--
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b***@gmail.com
2019-12-19 07:12:54 UTC
Permalink
I tryed using windex ammonia d. To speed up firmentation in my coffee cooking. Speeds it up at least 2 days.ammonia is a good source to use when speeding up firmentation process. The d to me means defect half life.
a***@gmail.com
2017-05-04 21:51:25 UTC
Permalink
Unlike some, even though it was raised 13 years ago it is not obsolete. I just searched this today and appreciate the answer. I wonder why people have found different reactions however with Windex with Ammonia-D and without.??? Perhaps other differences that weren't considered.
x***@gmail.com
2016-11-15 23:51:22 UTC
Permalink
Just downgraded its really a methanol blend not much different then windshield washer.
Norm X
2016-12-24 05:31:12 UTC
Permalink
See:

http://www.ewg.org/guides/cleaners/2505-WindexOriginalGlassCleanerwithAmmoniaD
c***@gmail.com
2017-05-21 20:11:11 UTC
Permalink
Windex Glass Cleaner is advertised as a special formula with exclusive
"Ammonia-D". I thought ammonia is NH3, no left-hand or right-hand
version to deserve a Nobel Prize. The only thing I can think of is ND3
(deuterium substitutes hydrogen), but it is unlikely that cheap Windex
contains such an expensive isotope.
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
--
I think it must be the new ingredient that makes it smell disgusting. :/
j***@gmail.com
2017-05-25 13:42:15 UTC
Permalink
Windex Glass Cleaner is advertised as a special formula with exclusive
"Ammonia-D". I thought ammonia is NH3, no left-hand or right-hand
version to deserve a Nobel Prize. The only thing I can think of is ND3
(deuterium substitutes hydrogen), but it is unlikely that cheap Windex
contains such an expensive isotope.
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
--
it tastes sooo good
j***@student.scit.org
2017-05-25 13:45:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Windex Glass Cleaner is advertised as a special formula with exclusive
"Ammonia-D". I thought ammonia is NH3, no left-hand or right-hand
version to deserve a Nobel Prize. The only thing I can think of is ND3
(deuterium substitutes hydrogen), but it is unlikely that cheap Windex
contains such an expensive isotope.
So, what exactly is "Ammonia-D"? TIA.
--
it tastes sooo good
I've heard similar things regarding that topic
m***@gmail.com
2017-07-19 21:46:16 UTC
Permalink
I have this question on my mind as well...I am considering using the Windex ammonia d product in the car I'm driving for window cleaning purposes...idk I really am hoping this can work without an added safety risk!? I am hoping someone can provide clarification?
-MELISSA Godar-
***@gmail.com
Krzysztof Mitko
2017-07-20 06:55:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
I have this question on my mind as well...I am considering using the Windex
ammonia d product in the car I'm driving for window cleaning purposes...idk I
really am hoping this can work without an added safety risk!? I am hoping
someone can provide clarification?
-MELISSA Godar-
Protip: always look for safety data sheet:

http://www.scjohnson.ca/msds/Windex%20Ammonia-D.pdf

Turns out it’s not ammonia - or at least ammonia concentration is too low
to be included in the list of ingredients.
--
A spokesman said: “Would you like to buy some of my spokes?”
Frank
2017-07-20 11:29:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Krzysztof Mitko
Post by m***@gmail.com
I have this question on my mind as well...I am considering using the Windex
ammonia d product in the car I'm driving for window cleaning purposes...idk I
really am hoping this can work without an added safety risk!? I am hoping
someone can provide clarification?
-MELISSA Godar-
http://www.scjohnson.ca/msds/Windex%20Ammonia-D.pdf
Turns out it’s not ammonia - or at least ammonia concentration is too low
to be included in the list of ingredients.
Its just a trademark and product may have contained ammonia in previous
formulations. EPA only requires disclosure if 1% or more. Their MSDS
is OK but not current to GHS standards but non-hazardous requiring no
symbols.
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