Discussion:
Does hydrogen have a “radiant state” and a “steady state”?
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Richard Kingstone
2020-01-15 13:41:37 UTC
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Hydrogen has a single electron. Two forces may be associated with the electron of hydrogen. The forces act simultaneously.

Force may be represented as a vector. The vectors of force may have a “radiant state” and a “steady state”. The states may be defined by “conditions” imposed upon the vectors.

The steady state will return the binding energy of the electron, and the radiant state will give the Stephan-Boltzmann constant.

Do conditions imposed upon the vectors represent different states of the electron?

Reference; http://newstuff77.weebly.com 04 The States of Hydrogen
o***@gmail.com
2020-01-16 00:05:46 UTC
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Post by Richard Kingstone
Hydrogen has a single electron. Two forces may be associated with the electron of hydrogen. The forces act simultaneously.
Force may be represented as a vector. The vectors of force may have a “radiant state” and a “steady state”. The states may be defined by “conditions” imposed upon the vectors.
The steady state will return the binding energy of the electron, and the radiant state will give the Stephan-Boltzmann constant.
Do conditions imposed upon the vectors represent different states of the electron?
Reference; http://newstuff77.weebly.com 04 The States of Hydrogen
Dear RK,

I propose that that electron has a radiant interaction with
one proton and it has a steady state interaction with distant atoms and ions
as an exclusion in space.

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