Discussion:
What will dissolve Shoe Goo quickly?
(too old to reply)
James
2008-10-30 05:08:48 UTC
Permalink
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?

I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.

I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.

Thanks for all input.
ransley
2008-10-30 11:08:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
Put gasolene in a covered pot, then put it on the stove on high for 38
minutes, goo will be gone.
James
2008-10-30 12:50:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by ransley
Put gasolene in a covered pot, then put it on the stove on high for 38
minutes, goo will be gone.
Gee, thanks!


**SMACK** upside your head.
Moldy Cheese
2008-10-30 15:23:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by ransley
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
Put gasolene in a covered pot, then put it on the stove on high for 38
minutes, goo will be gone.
So will stove, kitchen, house...
Red Green
2008-10-31 00:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Moldy Cheese
Post by ransley
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo
- the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive
stuff, acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it
dissolves Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot
of fumes and doesn't really work all that effectively from what
I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
Put gasolene in a covered pot, then put it on the stove on high for
38 minutes, goo will be gone.
So will stove, kitchen, house...
Geesh!, some people are so negative.
Huuitib
2019-05-08 20:14:02 UTC
Permalink
replying to ransley, Huuitib wrote:
That's idiotic. You'll burn down the house that way;!!!
--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/what-will-dissolve-shoe-goo-quickly-339089-.htm
Noem
2021-02-24 17:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Andrew Usher
2008-10-30 13:14:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I don't know the exact ingeridents. But it's likely that nothing will
dissolve it once it's cured; I'd bet it's a superglue-type
polymerisation.

It might be a good idea to post the ingeridents if it says anywhere
- or does anyone else know?

Andrew Usher
Frank
2008-10-30 13:21:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Usher
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I don't know the exact ingeridents. But it's likely that nothing will
dissolve it once it's cured; I'd bet it's a superglue-type
polymerisation.
It might be a good idea to post the ingeridents if it says anywhere
- or does anyone else know?
Andrew Usher
Not sure it's cured and years ago when I used some, I seem to recall a
chlorinated solvent like tetrachloroethylene or ethylene dichloride.
Think you can buy paint removers with methylene chloride.

As a polymer it will take long time to dissolve or plasticize enough for
mechanical removal.
Salmon Egg
2008-10-30 13:38:17 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
IIRC, the aroma of Shoe Goo reminded me of toluene. While not the
greatest substance to work with, there are many much worse. Next on my
list would be MEK, methyl ethyl ketone. That is more unpleasent.

Bill
--
Private Profit; Public Poop! Avoid collateral windfall!
James
2008-11-01 09:37:38 UTC
Permalink
IIRC, the aroma ofShoeGooreminded me of toluene. While not the
greatest substance to work with, there are many much worse. Next on my
list would be MEK, methyl ethyl ketone. That is more unpleasent.
Home Depot didn't have Toluene (I've also heard it'll rejuvenate dried
out magic markers) MEK definitely does the job. Nasty stuff though -
definitely outdoor use only. I've got the shoe set up outside on a
table, upside down - lay a cloth over the shoe bottom, pour the MEK
over the cloth holding my breath, then form a sheet of tinfoil over it
to impede evaporation. After a while it turns the Shoe Goo to mush,
which I scrape off with a folding knife, which seems to be the perfect
tool - use the flatter part of the blade to clean the broad areas and
curved depressions, the pointy part to get in the corners.

Thanks!
charlie
2008-10-30 15:09:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
did you call the 800 number on the side of the tube and ask them?
Noem
2021-02-24 17:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Obviously he called and asked them. It's pretty normal for a company to suggest getting help from homeownershub dot com rather than supporting their product themselves.
--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/what-will-dissolve-shoe-goo-quickly-339089-.htm
Krzysztof Mitko
2021-02-24 17:34:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Noem
Obviously he called and asked them. It's pretty normal for a company to
suggest getting help from homeownershub dot com rather than supporting their
product themselves.
You're not replying to "homeownershub" (whatever that is), you're replying to
an usenet group about chemistry.

Go fuck yourself.
--
A spokesman said: "Would you like to buy some of my spokes?"
Norminn
2008-10-30 16:58:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
IF any chemical will remove it, it would be important to know
composition of the item
it is being removed from. I did a google search on 'shoe goo msds" and
came up with
a link that provides an email addy to the co. for requesting MSDS:
http://www.eclecticproducts.com/SHOEGOODirections.htm

...and a link for technical data:
http://www.eclecticproducts.com/_tds/sg_tds.pdf
(uncured, remove w/acetone; cured, remove by cutting or scraping. "DO
NOT dry-clean Shoe GOO® because dry cleaning solvent breaks down the
cured adhesive.")
Bill Penrose
2008-10-30 16:01:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
It's a silicone that polymerizes when exposed to the moisture in the
air. Chances are that anything you use to remove it will dissolve the
shoe and leave the Shoe Goo. Your best bet is a good sharp Xacto
knife.

Dangerous Bill
b***@laceyschools.org
2013-11-10 17:17:12 UTC
Permalink
what will dissolve a shoe
Frank
2013-11-10 18:01:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@laceyschools.org
what will dissolve a shoe
http://eclecticproducts.com/_tds/sg_bg_r00_tds.pdf
k***@gmail.com
2016-06-28 22:43:02 UTC
Permalink
Fire
a***@gmail.com
2018-01-15 08:42:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by James
Anyone know of something that will quickly dissolve cured Shoe Goo -
the stuff in squeeze tube that cures to a rubber-like material?
I've tried paint remover - both citrus-based and the automotive stuff,
acetone, ligher fluid, even gasoline since I'd read that it dissolves
Shoe Goo. It seems to soften it some but it's got a lot of fumes and
doesn't really work all that effectively from what I've seen.
I'm re-doing some sneakers so I don't want to also dissolve the
sneaker material that the sole layer adheres to.
Thanks for all input.
i used shoegoo to stick the hair catcher on the shower drain. its on there good after shampoos and suds fr a year. i tried silicone hair serum and it can work because silicone liquid adheres to silicone solid and melts it ( dont ask how i found this out ) do not touch it or rub it in with a toothbrush just be patient and let it sit for a night dont shmush it in because it could leave a stain. any clear silicone hair serum is fine then take a cuticle cutter and every so gingerly nip away the glue if u mess up your shoe by digging to hard u ruined it
Lars
2021-01-19 20:15:02 UTC
Permalink
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but haven't tried yet
--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/what-will-dissolve-shoe-goo-quickly-339089-.htm
Rod Speed
2021-01-19 20:52:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
He has likely worked it out or has given up after 12 years.

Its unlikely he will read your post now.
Post by Lars
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For full context, visit
https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/what-will-dissolve-shoe-goo-quickly-339089-.htm
Peeler
2021-01-19 21:07:49 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Jan 2021 07:52:13 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest trollshit unread>
--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 86-year-old senile Australian
cretin's pathological trolling:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/rod-speed-faq.2973853/
Dan Espen
2021-01-19 21:24:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
You may or may not know this, but most of the posts on homeowners hub
are actually from Usenet.

On Usenet, we don't see old posts, only the most recent replies.
The post you just replied to is 12 years old. Please check
the dates and if you feel you must reply, please include the
original post in your reply.

Better yet, get a Usenet account. You can do this for free.
--
Dan Espen
Scott Lurndal
2021-01-19 23:21:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
You may or may not know this, but most of the posts on homeowners hub
are actually from Usenet.
On Usenet, we don't see old posts, only the most recent replies.
The post you just replied to is 12 years old. Please check
the dates and if you feel you must reply, please include the
original post in your reply.
Better yet, get a Usenet account. You can do this for free.
I think your assumption that HH posters follow up their posts
and look for replies is flawed.
Rod Speed
2021-01-20 00:13:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
You may or may not know this, but most of the posts on homeowners hub
are actually from Usenet.
On Usenet, we don't see old posts, only the most recent replies.
The post you just replied to is 12 years old. Please check
the dates and if you feel you must reply, please include the
original post in your reply.
Better yet, get a Usenet account. You can do this for free.
I think your assumption that HH posters follow up their posts
and look for replies is flawed.
A few have responded, not many, certainly, but a few have.
Peeler
2021-01-20 09:12:58 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Jan 2021 11:13:44 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Post by Rod Speed
Post by Scott Lurndal
I think your assumption that HH posters follow up their posts
and look for replies is flawed.
A few have responded, not many, certainly, but a few have.
In auto-contradicting mode again, senile pest? <BG>
--
Kerr-Mudd,John addressing the auto-contradicting senile cretin:
"Auto-contradictor Rod is back! (in the KF)"
MID: <***@85.214.115.223>
Dan Espen
2021-01-20 01:37:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
You may or may not know this, but most of the posts on homeowners hub
are actually from Usenet.
On Usenet, we don't see old posts, only the most recent replies.
The post you just replied to is 12 years old. Please check
the dates and if you feel you must reply, please include the
original post in your reply.
Better yet, get a Usenet account. You can do this for free.
I think your assumption that HH posters follow up their posts
and look for replies is flawed.
But I'm quite sure 30 years from now someone there will reply.
--
Dan Espen
micky
2021-01-20 02:37:37 UTC
Permalink
In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 19 Jan 2021 16:24:39 -0500, Dan Espen
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
You may or may not know this, but most of the posts on homeowners hub
are actually from Usenet.
On Usenet, we don't see old posts, only the most recent replies.
But if we were reading 12 years ago, we might still have the post in our
computer. I use an old version of Agent, 1.93, and it can't handle 12
years of AHR, but maybe version 8 can. OTOH, if the one from 12 years
ago is there, replies will follow right after it, and we won't see the
replies.

Life is so complicated.
Post by Dan Espen
The post you just replied to is 12 years old. Please check
the dates and if you feel you must reply, please include the
original post in your reply.
Better yet, get a Usenet account. You can do this for free.
Absolutely.
Tekkie©
2021-01-21 21:30:18 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 19 Jan 2021 16:24:39 -0500, Dan Espen posted for all of us to digest...
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Lars
Coleman fuel softens it so it can be scraped off. It is cleaner than
gasoline. And doesnt leave any residue. MEK aparently also works but
haven't tried yet.
You may or may not know this, but most of the posts on homeowners hub
are actually from Usenet.
On Usenet, we don't see old posts, only the most recent replies.
The post you just replied to is 12 years old. Please check
the dates and if you feel you must reply, please include the
original post in your reply.
Better yet, get a Usenet account. You can do this for free.
Attaboy #1, but you know how that goes...
--
Tekkie
Eat Sleep & Design!
2021-03-08 18:45:02 UTC
Permalink
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid, lemon oil — NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands! And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/what-will-dissolve-shoe-goo-quickly-339089-.htm
rbowman
2021-03-09 03:29:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil — NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Tekkie©
2021-03-10 21:52:10 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
--
Tekkie
rbowman
2021-03-11 03:06:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tekkie©
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
Peeler
2021-03-11 09:47:46 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:06:34 -0700, lowbrowwoman, Birdbrain's eternal senile
whore!
Post by rbowman
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
ROTFLOL!!! You really like to use big words, eh, you endlessly bullshitting
senile bigmouth? And you clearly love to hear yourself talking! LOL
Snag
2021-03-11 13:31:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink!  How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
And I have a gallon of it (thank you very much Wally) . I think Lexel
caulking is the same thing as SG , I'll try some of that solvent and see
what happens .
--
Snag
In 1775, the British demanded we give them our guns.
We shot them.
Tekkie©
2021-03-11 20:04:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:06:34 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
Tastes great, less filling! :O(
--
Tekkie
rbowman
2021-03-12 02:58:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tekkie©
On Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:06:34 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
Tastes great, less filling! :O(
Stop huffing the xylene...
Tekkie©
2021-03-12 19:57:57 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 19:58:19 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:06:34 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
Tastes great, less filling! :O(
Stop huffing the xylene...
But, but, but, it's methylated (whatever that is...) Is that like Kool
cigarettes?
--
Tekkie
rbowman
2021-03-13 02:19:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tekkie©
On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 19:58:19 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:06:34 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Mon, 8 Mar 2021 20:29:18 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Eat Sleep & Design!
I have tried acetone based nail polish remover, WD40, lighter fluid,
lemon oil ? NONE of these are working to remove Shoe Goo from hands!
And yikes the sink! How to really remove this...?
Time...
Grinder? Call the company? IDK
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
Tastes great, less filling! :O(
Stop huffing the xylene...
But, but, but, it's methylated (whatever that is...) Is that like Kool
cigarettes?
methyl != menthol
Mild Man
2021-03-13 20:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tekkie©
On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 19:58:19 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
Post by Tekkie©
On Wed, 10 Mar 2021 20:06:34 -0700, rbowman posted for all of us to digest...
Post by rbowman
My tube list toluene so that might work or possibly xylene. Xylene is
methylated toluene and benzene.
Tastes great, less filling! :O(
Stop huffing the xylene...
But, but, but, it's methylated (whatever that is...) Is that like Kool
cigarettes?
"Methylated" means that it has a methyl group (CH3) attached. A benzene molecule is six carbon atoms in a ring, with a hydrogen atom attached to each one, C6H6. A toluene is a benzene molecule with one of the hydrogens replaced by a methyl group, C7H8 (or C6H5-CH3).

Xylene is a benzene molecule with two of its hydrogens replaced by methyl groups. They can be right beside each other on the ring, separated by one hydrogen, or across from each other. So there are three different kinds of xylene, all with the same chemical formula. But they have slightly different physical and chemical properties. For the purpose of dissolving Shoe Goo, I doubt if it makes any difference which one is used. They'd all work (or not work) about the same.
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